Leadership is everything

I am working with a great team at the moment, they are very capable, very professional and very well lead by their own leader.  Recently they did an engagement survey of the people they lead and were surprised to find that the level of engagement was low.

We ran the Holos Change Engagement study, (which looks at intellectual, emotional, physical and spiritual levels of engagement) with the team and found that they themselves where not wholly engaged in their work.

We did a session where we explored times in their life where they had been fully engaged with what they were doing and they came up with a really solid list of factors that enable full engagement.

Vision – Inspiration – Feedback – Recognition – Openness

Vision is a quality that is often misunderstood and visions are frequently difficult for a team to articulate.  When you get a vision right it can be transformative.  It is important to differentiate a vision from an objective – an objective is something we know how to achieve, a vision is not.  If you know how to achieve it, it is not a vision, it is an objective.

A vision is a destination that the team are really motivated to achieve, a place everyone in the team (particularly the leaders) wants to get to and will make sacrifices, difficult choices and get out of their comfort zone to realise.

Teams that succeed have leaders who are the deepest, most sincere, whole hearted and authentic embodiment of the vision.

Inspiration is the ability to get people to achieve things that they did not think they were capable of.  As a leader it is a way of connecting the vision with the unique capabilities of the individuals, and the team, and demonstrating and transmitting belief from leader to team in such a way that members of the team challenge themselves to succeed.  They work harder, more creatively and more effectively to deliver results in pursuit of the vision.

Feedback is the skill of specifically upgrading the performance of the team or an individual.  It is how leaders guide the behaviour and culture of the team to the level it needs to be at to deliver.  Feedback is not a weapon or a way of airing frustrations.  Sometimes feedback needs to be given publicly and immediately to make the boundaries clear to all.  Sometimes feedback needs to be tough, direct and in private.  Sometimes feedback needs to be supportive, nurturing and generous.  One particularly effective mode of nurturing feedback is the “even better if…”  As in, “that was a great piece of work, I wonder if it could be even better if…”

Leaders can only know which to use when and only use it legitimately if the ground rules and values of the team are clearly set out and agreed to beforehand.  The ground rules and values provide a platform for all team members and particularly leaders to tackle difficult issues fairly.

Recognition is closely related to feedback and also distinct.  My experience is that teams are often good at formal recognition, but weak on ad hoc recognition. Having said that recognition looses it’s potency if it is overused or platitudinous.  Recognition is at its most effective when deployed to help a colleague see a quality or strength in themselves that they may not previously have understood or been aware of.  Or to set a performance benchmark for the team.  Ad hoc recognition is one of the absolute key tools for demonstrating belief in a team or team member.

Openness is a cultural dynamic that leaders create through their own behaviour.  A leader who is opaque and political will create a team full of politics, gossip and rumour.  To have a team which is open trusting and collaborative, leaders will often have to be transparent beyond their own comfort zone and will need to frequently test whether they need to be more open.  People need to understand the context in order to be at their most effective, even if the context is that “this is all that I know” or “this is all that I can tell you”.

Being open as a leader is not just about sharing context, it is also about creating a culture of openness in the team.  A culture where people will communicate mistakes and problems early, rather than covering them up, a culture where people will share knowledge and information with colleagues rather than using it as a power play.  For the leader it is both about communicating and listening generously.

As regular readers will be aware, I am passionate about leadership.  I believe that truly excellent leadership is generally poorly understood and poorly practiced.  And I believe in the totally transformative power of leadership. People can be influenced to do and believe things that they did not realise they wanted to do or think.  Leadership can create appalling horrors or extraordinary beauty depending on the wholeness of the leader.

Holos has a vision to contribute to making holistic leadership ubiquitous in our society within 175 years.  We want to see this kind of leadership taught in schools and deployed for the good of society in business, politics and the public sector.

Holos believes that “Change is Easy” or at least it can be when it is done well. Holos has the resources and the skill to help organisations of any size to flourish in the future.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com

With love

nx

Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

http://www.neilcrofts.com
http://www.holoschange.com

Posted in Leadership | Leave a comment

Reliability

How many times do organisations make statements, commitments or promises and then fail to deliver?

How many times do we make statements, commitments or promises, on behalf of ourselves or an organisation and then fail to deliver?

For organisations, or even for us as individuals, there may be hundreds of reasons why we fail to deliver and it can often be a bit of a surprise when promises are met.

Last week, we as Holos went to Stockholm to explore this question with our collaborators at Time to Performance, we met to discuss the challenge with a number of Swedish businesses and thinkers.

The first question is who are we making these promises to?

Often with personal challenges like weight loss, diet, exercise etc the promise is mainly to ourselves, but at a personal level we may also make such statements to family and others close to us.  For organisations the commitments are to employees, shareholders, customers, regulators and other stakeholders.

The second question is what kind of statement is it really?

Some statements are just information – “the next train will be ten minutes late”  (although if it is now 15 minutes late, would be passengers may see that as a broken promise).

Others are promises – “we promise 99% of our trains will not be more than 10 minutes late.”

Some are aspirations – “Our aim is for 99% of trains to be on time.”

It is important that the communication of these statements is not ambiguous, it is very easy to be caught out by an aspiration being taken as a promise.  We are all frequently guilty of wording that construes an aspiration as a promise.

Thirdly we need deep self knowledge or organisational awareness to be able to know which aspirations or promises are realistic and which are not.

The reason we fail on our promises and aspiration is a mixture of over ambition, under commitment and very occasionally force majure.

If organisations are to gain a reputation for reliability those who might make statements to stakeholders first have to know the organisation well, they also have to be very aware of the kind of statement they are making, they have to be deeply personally committed to making it happen and they have to be willing to configure the organisation around making it happen.

If we take our railway example above, what would it take to deliver on any sort of reliability promise?

  • If we didn’t have control of key variables, such as the track, we would need to have highly trusting relationships with those partners to minimise those risks.
  • We would need to be confident in the quality of our own equipment, such as computer systems and rolling stock.
  • We would need to have good relationships with our own employees and build a real culture of trust and punctuality to be able to rely on them to deliver.
  • We would need the commitment to the promise to be deeply shared by all executives and leaders and for them to continually reinforce it.
  • We would need to organise things, like rewards, recognition and culture so that meeting the promise matters to all of those with a role in delivering it – emotionally, physically, rationally and spiritually.
  • We would need to not have too many such promises so that people could stay focussed.

Between us at Time to Performance and Holos we are developing a toolset called Corporate Reliability that helps organisations to understand the statements they have already made.  We then work with the leadership to help configure the organisation around delivering the promises and being in a position to deliver on the aspirations.

We are enthusiastically collecting promises made by businesses and studying wether and how they are delivered or not.  If you have some examples (especially with photos) please send them to me.

Holos believes that “Change is Easy” or at least it can be when it is done well. Holos has the resources and the skill to help organisations of any size to flourish in the future.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com

With love

nx

Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

http://www.neilcrofts.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

Posted in Business, Leadership | Leave a comment

Design thinking, leadership and transformation

Have you been onto any UK Government websites recently?  Registering to vote or taxing a car or something like that?

I registered to vote in April.  I went to a website, clicked a few links, typed a couple of things and that was it – I was astonished that it could be so simple.  I thought it must be some kind of aberration that a government service could be so simple.  But, I didn’t think too much more about it.

Then last week I had the great good fortune to hear Ben Terret, Design Director of GDS (Government Digital Service), give a talk.

GDS, part of the Cabinet Office, is transforming the way government is done through a combination of design and boldness.  It is utterly remarkable and incredibly instructive about what success will look like in the fully digital world we are creating.  That a government department is leading the way eradicates any possible excuse of bureaucracy.

Before I explain more about GDS, just a word on how things got complicated in the first place.

In a pre digital world information is hard to come by and hard to copy reliably.  It is therefore easy to wield information as a weapon.  In our pre-digital society 1.0, since the beginning of civilisation people have created multiple ways of using information to confer power on themselves.   Examples might include the way that Lawyers and other professionals create their own language or a business division controls processes to create a need for which they can control the fulfilment.

A consequence of this is what we often call organisational “Silos”, separate vertical power bases within a single system.  Power bases that do not reach out collaboratively across the organisation but seek to hold information and control vertically within their own system.  Inevitably this leads to a confusing maze of competing systems which fulfil similar roles, but offer different experiences.

Digital, by which I mean software based systems as opposed to physically based systems, changes the paradigm on information.  Information is no longer scarce or hard to copy reliably.  Information is abundant and easily duplicated.  However this does not, on it’s own change the behaviour of those holding power through information scarcity on it’s own.  This is where GDS come in.

For a change to occur in a human system there needs to be an agent of change (this is why my title at Holos is Agent).  An agent could be an individual, a team, an external organisation or a thing, what that agent of change does is to demonstrate a different way of doing things that is so compelling and inspiring that change becomes inevitable.

You can read more about GDS, their Seven Design Principles and their way of thinking on their website.  The bit that I want to pull out, is the bit that I think is the most transformational, and that is their strategy.

The strategy is to deliver.

That’s it.

Using Agile methodology GDS focus on user needs to develop a minimum viable product, deliver and iterate.

They don’t discuss to much with senior people or spend ages in meetings trying to persuade people.  They deliver a prototype.  They get real user feedback and iterate.

They deliver so fast and so frequently and iterate so quickly that critics don’t have time to get in the way.

To do this they have built a great team who trust each other and are fully engaged with the cause.

The GDS playbook for transforming government is:

1 – build a trusting and engaged team
2 – Deliver Alpha, Beta and launch, keep iterating based on real user feedback.
3 – Keep it simple and communicate

If it can work for government, it can work for any organisation.

Holos believes that “Change is Easy” or at least it can be when it is done well. Holos has the resources and the skill to help organisations of any size to flourish in the future.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com

With love

nx

Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

http://www.neilcrofts.com
http://www.holoschange.com

Posted in innovation, Leadership | Leave a comment

Megatrends

Three megatrends of Digitisation, Decarbonisation and Aging will change our lives more over the next ten years than in the previous fifty.

We have already seen digitisation transform many aspects of our lives, but three of the most significant areas have thus far resisted change. They are banking, health and home. By 2025 all of these will have been through a digital makeover every bit as transformational as that we have seen in music, retail and advertising.

By 2025 cash and bank branches will be endangered species. The smart banks will have redefined themselves as guardians of not just our physical assets, but also of our identity and our data, possibly even helping us to earn income by negotiating with companies who currently use our data for free (like Facebook).

New technology (like Blockchain the tech behind Bitcoin) will see the cost of transactions and banking plummeting towards zero. New competitors will dive into less regulated banking services like lending. The user interface for finance and many other services will be our own virtual assistant like Apple’s Siri or Amazon Echo. We won’t choose an institution and ask them for a loan – we will simply ask our assistant to find a car for us and the assistant will suggest that a loan might be a good way to to finance it.

Banks will shrink dramatically in workforce with all of their manual processes being automated. Lots of historically safe middle class jobs will disappear. Artificial Intelligence (AI) will do much of the analysis for credit applications and investments, tracking many, many more variables, social media for example, to make better and faster decisions.

In healthcare the advance of wearables, implants and other health trackers will move medicine from remedial, problem solving towards predictive and preventative. At the same time augmentations like light weight, powered exo-skeletons, 3D printing and nano technology will come of age to help in recovery from serious injury.

Video calls, real time voice translation and wearables will move many doctor visits from a physical location to a call, meaning that the doctor could be anywhere and not even use the same language as the patient. AI will emerge in health care as well, tracking data from wearables and implants and assessing it against massive meta data in the cloud. AI will advise doctors and patients helping with diagnosis and treatment. Conformance with medicine, exercise or dietary regimes will also be measured by devices, giving patients and doctors real rather than anecdotal evidence.

Homes will become smarter too with many moving off grid with their own generation and storage solutions. Energy use and efficiently will be routinely monitored for improvement. Security, entertainment, lighting and temperature will be far more automated or remotely controlled.

Even shopping, gardening and cleaning will become more automated with automated deliveries, drones and robots becoming more and more common.

Another endangered species by 2025 will be the petrol station. Classic car owners may even have to have petrol delivered to their home as the business model for widely available petrol stations will be disappearing.

Disappearing petrol stations will only be one sign of the rapid decarbonisation of society. Falling costs of solar PV and batteries and new technologies like graphene capacitors will see issues of “intermittency”, “range anxiety” and price overcome.

Within ten years fully electric vehicles will be the norm they will be cheaper to buy and run than combustion engines and regulation and taxation will favour them. Solar PV will be so cheap and so adaptable that all sorts of flat surfaces will be covered in them – like the solar cycle path that was installed in the Netherlands earlier this year. Transparent solar PV will cover windows and cheap solar PV matting will cover roofs.

Domestic and utility scale batteries will put homes and communities off grid and energy independence will come down to a single home scale. This energy independence will transform the geopolitical map. Smart middle East countries are already diversifying their economies away from oil, but others will be left stranded without a sufficient income. The global influence of fossil fuel nations will diminish.

Oil and gas companies will see the asset base on which their companies are valued trapped under ground. Unless they are able to harness their engineering skills to drill for geothermal energy and build for off shore wind and tidal generation they will close down (after a grand round of consolidation).

Also by 2025 over 20 countries (mostly in Europe) will have over 20% of their population over 65, by 2030 it will be 34 countries. The only large country to have a youthful population is India. India, with its well educated, democratic and young population, will be the powerhouse economy of the middle of the mid century. The only thing that will inhibit this will be India’s terrible infrastructure – however solar PV and battery technology means that India can leapfrog directly to a decentralised energy system.

Japan with it’s low birth and immigration rates is already suffering the consequences of an ageing and shrinking population. Over a quarter of the population is over 65 already. The zero growth economy they have been in over the last 20 years has been largely because of this. Some small towns are already depopulating drastically.

Smaller working populations and larger retired populations will neatly match the rise in automation and the mass disappearance of jobs. Future careers will be built on technology development and value adding services.

In Europe immigration from Africa and the Middle East will help to delay the worst effects of an ageing population, but most of us already accept that we will be working far longer than our parents did and our children will work longer still.

The implications of all of this is that both businesses and individuals will need to spend far more time planning for the future. Many sectors have been successful over centuries by basing the future on the past. They have been able to focus on getting really good at what they do, rather than getting good enough and moving on.

Effectively every sector will become the tech sector, whether it is banking, retail, pharmacy or energy everything will shift to “Moore’s Law” and thus will be driven by ever lowering costs and ever increasing efficency.

There will be massive social and political implications of all of this change as well. Governments too will need to become far more agile in thinking about social care, resource deployment and law making.

Holos believes that “Change is Easy” or at least it can be when it is done well. Holos has the resources and the skill to help organisations of any size to flourish in the future.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com

With love

nx

Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

http://www.neilcrofts.com
http://www.holoschange.com

Posted in Business, innovation, society | Leave a comment

Leadership, Culture and Change

Any group of humans quickly forms a culture.  Typically cultures, once formed, are fairly stable, requiring some significant influence to change them.  But – they can change and change significantly and quickly with sufficient influence.

As an individual we might be a involved in several different cultures and may, consciously or unconsciously, adjust our behaviour as we shift from one to another.

For a business, culture is critically important.  Culture determines levels of performance and risk.  It will define how the organisation responds to success, failure or crisis.  It will control how newcomers are welcomed or not and how the organisation responds to change and innovation.  Make no mistake culture is everything.

The greatest influence on culture is from leadership (formal and informal), but the environment, the product and the market will be among the other influences. For most businesses the culture they have is an accident.  And if a culture is not intentionally designed and curated, what forms may or may not be suited to the objectives of the organisation.

Increasingly new businesses are highly intentional about their culture and some companies are so proud of their intentional culture design that they go public about it.  Netflix Culture Deck, Zappos Values and the Valve Handbook are all available online and give an insight into how these organisations intentionally curate their culture.

However, this still leaves many, many organisations with cultures that are not ideally suited to the results they would like to get.  Internally focussed customer service organisations, self orientated banks, conservative software companies, buccaneering oil and gas companies and so on.

Most of these companies will remain as they are unless something happens to make them change.   There are three reasons that organisations choose to change their culture.

1 – it is forced on them by crisis (and often regulators).
2 – it becomes necessary through mergers and acqusiitons
3 – the market/results/competitors demand it

You will deduce from this that it is rare for organisations to spontaneously decide that culture change is what they need. Yet the surest way to sustain success and minimise risks is an adaptive self aware, culture that continually adjusts to the prevailing conditions.

If leaders are the greatest influencers on culture, it follows that for cultures to change leaders are critical to the process. Leaders have to accept the role of culture in performance and the role of leadership in culture.  They have to be willing to let go of the idea that they are there to lead/control/manage performance and accept the idea that they are there to curate the culture and that if they do that well, the performance will follow.

Helping these organisations change their culture to one that delivers the performance they seek in terms of service, or reliability or innovation or risk is what Holos does. Without giving away the “secret sauce” of how Holos delivers on the promise “Change is Easy”, I can share some of the principles that are in play, for example:

The process starts with identifying the target culture that the organisation needs, while at the same time establishing trust and engagement among those who are responsible for the business, division or department.

We move on to work with the leaders and teams to engage them with the vision of how the culture can be and the benefits it holds for them and prepare them for their role as leaders of culture rather than performance.

It is important to minimise distraction from other projects and priorities and to build the emotional, spiritual, rational and physical resilience in the leadership and then the organisation that will see the changes work through.

Whatever leaders choose it is a truth that all organisations are perfectly designed for the results they are getting.  If you are not happy with the results of your enterprise, you have to look at all aspects of how it is designed including the culture.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com

With love

nx

Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

http://www.neilcrofts.com
http://www.holoschange.com

Posted in Leadership, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What have the Romans done for us?

A few years ago I was given the opportunity of a lifetime for a consultant.  “Come to Rome and use it’s history to help a team from Microsoft understand how empires fall.”

With my existing understanding of Roman history, I was excited:

  •  An empire that lasted for a thousand years in the West and nearly two thousand years in the East.  (To put it into perspective this was about 850 longer than the British Empire in the shorter lived Western part.)
  • Amazing, buildings and technology:  The Colosseum was the largest sports stadium in the world until the 20th century.  The Romans invented concrete and then the technology was lost for hundreds of years.  And Roman influence is evident in virtually all European languages, architecture and culture.

I read, watched documentaries, asked experts and yet I arrived in Rome without a fixed idea of how I would bring the theme to life.  I arrived in the middle of the afternoon the day before we were due to start.  Fortunately it was summer and the days were long.  I checked into the hotel and dashed out, map in hand.  I ran from site to site taking it all in and persuading the staff at the Forum entrance that I really did want a full ticket, even with only an hour left to closing time.

I went from the Forum to the Palaces of the Palatine, saw the Circus Maximus and Trajan’s Column, Titus’ Arch, Caesar’s Forum, The Colosseum and the Pantheon and read everything I could find about it all.

That evening I scoured the pamphlets I had picked up and filled in the gaps with Wikipedia and gradually the narrative came together.

The following morning the team from Microsoft arrived we started the day conventionally enough as I facilitated a meeting and then in the afternoon we set off on a walk around Rome.

Our first stop was on a small grassy bank in a park with a view of the Colosseum.  On this hill side in the 15th Century a young man had fallen through a cleft in the rock and found himself in a strange cave with figures painted on the wall.  It turned out that he had stumbled into the remains of the extraordinary Domus Aurea, Nero’s Golden Palace.  Built to emphasise his glory and power it covered between 100 and 300 acres including the site of what is now the Colosseum where a huge lake had been constructed with a full sized galley for Nero to have convenient boat trips.  In fact the Colosseum takes its name from the colossal 30 meter high bronze statue of Nero that had stood nearby and was remodelled, after Nero’s death, into a representation of the Sun God Helios, by the time the Stadium was built.

Together we toured the Colosseum, the Palatine and The Forum and I shared the stories and the history of the various places.  Finally we made our way to the Pantheon which is where the empire narrative concluded.

The Pantheon nearly 2000 years old, still holds the record for having the largest unreinforced concrete dome ever built.  It survived the earthquakes that damaged the Colosseum, it survived invasions, riots and wars.

The Domus Aurea lasted barely 70 years,

The difference was that wheras the vast palace was built to the glory of a single individual the Pantheon was built to the glory of all of the Gods.   Once Nero had died, no one wanted to sustain the memory of his excess.

The lesson we drew was that any enterprise will only be sustained for as long as it is delivering value to enough of it’s stakeholders.  Whenever a small elite are allowed to become the main beneficiaries at the expense of other stakeholders, decline has already set in.  This goes for business as well as political empires.

In October this year I will return to Rome with my business partner Mark Thompson and a group of like minded senior leaders from a variety of significant businesses to ask:

Is it possible to understand Europe in the 21st Century by examining Rome in the 5th? Can we compare the conditions that led to the downfall of the Western Roman Empire to the ‘end of an epoch’ experience we seem to be having today? Join a group of like minded peers as romp round the domain of the rational in Rome, October 2015.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.
You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com
With love
nx
Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com

 

Posted in Business, coaching and training, Leadership | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Change is easy

I promised to answer the question of what I have been doing during my two year blog hiatus.  I set out with an intention nearly fifteen years ago to bring authenticity and authentic leadership to the highest levels of globally significant corporations.  And that is what I have been doing.
The first thing to say is that I can either tell you who I have been working with or what I have been doing but not both.   I think the “what” is more useful than the “who”, so that is what I will say.
The second thing to say is that I have been working with a supremely talented group of people, who are collectively known as The Faculty.
The Faculty comprises a remarkable selection of academics, artists, performers, writers, soldiers, comedians and others who have come together to transform the cultures of two global businesses.
The Faculty was set up by some extraordinarily far sighted individuals at these businesses and they recruited this band of like minded influencers as external consultants to help effect dramatic change in leadership, culture, performance and reputation.
The experience of being part of The Faculty is an honour.  I have travelled around the world to team up with someone I have never met on a two day workshop.  I have arrived the evening before, we have clicked right away and been able to deliver an inspiring and transformational experience to 20 or 30 employees.  This has not happened just once, or just to me, it has happened repeatedly in different cultures.
I have had the privilege of working in this way all over the world in India, Indonesia, Azerbaijan, Angola, Egypt, China and many more.  We have worked with graduate recruits, middle level and senior level leaders.  What we have found in most cases sincere and thoughtful people who want to do the best they can.  They are often hampered by fears that exist in the organisational culture.  Our role has been to help people transcend those fears and transform the culture.
Between us and over time we have been able to help these organisations become values based and more open and honest places to be.  Places where everyone can feel valued and can speak their mind, changing the experience for over 200,000 employees and eventually for many, many more contractors, customers and other stakeholders.
The Faculty are highly professional coaches, consultants and trainers that you can trust utterly to deliver what is needed to any business or group.
That is why working with another member of The Faculty, Mark Thompson, we have founded a consultancy for the 21st century which can deploy this amazing resource of over 100 gifted challengers, for businesses globally.
The work we have already done together with these clients has been defining for those organisations.  We have worked at the highest levels transforming the way decisions are made, leadership behaviours, the ways teams interact and the results that the organisations get.  We have coached top level leaders.  We have designed and run leadership and team development programs for tens of thousands of staff in every corner of the globe. We have taught team-working, leadership, ethics, change, relationships, feedback, courage and more.
Holos is now our vehicle to bring this incredible value to other organisations, deployed at any level and on any scale.  Through Holos we believe that “change is easy” because we have seen it done.  We have bottled the formula and now want to make it available to other organisations that want to change their culture and their performance.
Threat is change you are not leading.
Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.
You can subscribe for free at http://www.neilcrofts.com
Become a fan on Facebook
Follow on Twitter
With love
nx
Neil Crofts
authentic business
neil@neilcrofts.com
Posted in Business, coaching and training | Leave a comment