New Book…

How would it feel to discover the secret to sustained success?

A way to deliver long term positive results in your own career, in your organisation even for a country or a whole society?

A way to energise, inspire and motivate yourself and others to bring the very best version of themselves to work every day.

A way to feel empowered and adaptable about the future.

A way to protect your job, organisation or society from future harm.

These are big claims, but this is what we have been working on and what we hope “Stealing from the Future, and how you can stop it” explains how to do.

I have just been putting the finishing touches to the book that I have co authored with my business partner in Holos, Mark Thompson.  We are both very excited by it.

The book is both quite different and builds on the themes of my previous books.  Different, in that it shares some of what I have learned in the 11 years since my last book and adds Mark’s tremendous knowledge and insight as well.  Similar, in that the fundamental conclusion is that authenticity is a big part of what we need both individually and collectively.

Over those 11 years both Mark and I have worked with literally tens of thousands of leaders in dozens of companies all over the world.  We have coached, done team building, run strategy sessions, helped good teams become great, helped dysfunctional teams and organisations improve, worked with great leaders and highly stressed leaders, lectured at universities, given keynotes at conferences and more.

In every single one of those interactions we have learned.  What we have learned is how leadership and culture really work and how they enable or constrain change.  It has been an 11 year study in leadership and this new book is our thesis.

The book is called “Stealing From the Future, and how you can stop it”.

Stealing from the future refers to a very common style of leadership, throughout human history, that generates results now by doing things that push the cost into the future, whether by a few hours or days or by months or years.  The book argues that what we need is a leadership style that prioritises sustained success over stealing from the future.

At a minimum stealing from the future creates a cultural cost for the individuals working on it, it also leads to boom and bust for teams, business and whole economies.  On the grandest scale it has lead to climate change.

The book reaches far beyond the normal business book space and ends up as a study on where we are as a species, the challenges and opportunities we face and what we can do about them both individually and collectively.  The book shares all that we have learned about how leadership and culture work and how every single one of us can be a better and more authentic leader and how that makes a difference to our own lives and to those around us.

As well as discussing the philosophical  aspects of the challenge the book is also practical, explaining the connections between performance, culture and leadership and how any of us can lead, from wherever we are in an organisation, how we can influence both culture and performance.

Centrally it explains how we can deliver sustained success, without stealing from the future.

The book will be published in September by Holos and will be available through Amazon both in print and as an e-book and from the Apple iBook store as an e-book.  We hope to expand the availability later.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

 

Advertisements
Posted in authenticity, Business, Leadership, society | 1 Comment

Dealing with conflict

There was a time when being labelled “conflict averse” was something of a criticism.  I am not sure that I ever understood what people really meant by it, because surely the opposite: “conflict inclined” is worse.

What is clear is that whatever our attitude to conflict, when a situation arises it is generally better to take an intentional approach to solving it rather than try to ignore or avoid it.

I was reminded of this while delivering a session for a large pharma company recently.  One participant in particular had shown up very strongly, they were deeply insightful and powerful in their contributions.  However when we got into a conversation about dealing with some poor behaviour from their line manager they lost all of their power and insight.

Here was a successful professional whose career is being compromised by their relationship with their line manager.  An individual who can deal with all sorts of situations, except when it comes to dealing with “conflict” with an authority figure.

So – let’s analyse this situation and see if we can find a solution, that can apply to any of us that find ourselves in a similar place.   A person who is otherwise capable is substantially diminished by a situation with an authority figure.

The first question is what happened?  Not because the details are important, but because the reaction to whatever happened seems to be disproportionate – unless the authority figure has done something truly terrible, which is unlikely.

If what happened is not terrible and our reaction is disproportionate, the implication is that the individual is being “triggered” by the situation to and by a previous event.  Typically this would be a previous or childhood incident or relationship with another authority figure.

For example; we might have had an overbearing teacher, in our teens who repeatedly criticised us for things over which we had no control.  This might set a trigger, which lays dormant and unknown for years, until we again perceive ourselves as being criticised for something we cannot control.  At this moment the trigger is  pulled and we are unconsciously psychologically transported back to our teens and our relationship with that overbearing teacher.  We feel the same sense of powerlessness as we did as a teen, even though the objective circumstances are quite different and the new situation is one we could deal with.

In this situation we have to face up to this “inner’ event, before we can be objective about the external event.  Happily, simply joining the dot’s and identifying the trigger can be enough.  We don’t even always have to identify the specific moment or individual, it can be enough to identify the broader circumstance or relationship.  If this is not enough we might need to dig a bit deeper.  The usual suspects are any childhood authority figure – typically teachers or parents, but religious figures, sports coaches and scout leaders also crop up.  Siblings can also come into play,  although they are more likely to affect relationships with peers than authority figures.

Once we have worked through any potential triggering, it may well be that there is nothing more to deal with.  Simply releasing the trigger is enough to allow our own reaction to become a response and we can deal with these situations easily in the future – although we might need to remind ourselves to do so.

If our reaction was not disproportionate, we must deal, objectively and intentionally with the situation.

The second question is “what would we truly like the outcome to be?”

When we feel wronged in any way, there is always a temptation to “vent” to let our anger out and tell people what we think of them.  However, this is rarely productive.  We need to get past our emotions (perhaps by letting them out safely to a trusted friend, or just taking our time) and focus on the best possible outcome.

Once we have clarity on the outcome we can consider the conversation we need to have to get to it.  If having this conversation feels daunting, we can practice it with our patient friend, until we feel confident.  If our friend knows the authority figure in question that may help to factor in potential reactions and responses so that we can adjust our approach.

What we are looking for is a way of “selling” our desired outcome to the authority figure. If we are looking for a change in behaviour or an apology, we will need to include, what’s in it for them?  What benefit do they gain or pain do they avoid through doing whatever we are suggesting?

The main thing is to face up to these situations promptly, intentionally and effectively rather than allowing them to fester.  Each time we are able to do this we take a step forward in our lives, feel better about ourselves and are more effective in our work.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What if…

Last week we had out faculty conference and about 35 of our wonderful faculty met over two days in London to learn, explore and share.  Our vision at Holos is Universal Authentic Leadership and conversations at the conference helped us to think about how we can get closer to this.

I would like to explore what the effect of Universal Authentic Leadership might be in business, education and government.  Being authentic is knowing yourself and being it, skilfully in all situations.  Authentic Leadership adds enabling others to be authentic as well, while leading towards a positive purpose together.  It is NOT about saying whatever comes into your head even if it hurts or harms others.

Business

What if the best possible business model was one that created value for all life, especially future life?

Most conventional businesses currently operate on an extractive or exploitative, win/lose business model.  In this model someone or something has to lose in order for them to gain.  Very often this is our environment, workers, competitors or other animals.  Very often this is our children and our children’s children.

Imagine a business model that instead of working on win/lose, worked on win/win and even win/win/win.  A business model that profited from creating value for the widest possible sphere of life.  Creating value for workers, for competitors, for communities, for animals, plants and crucially for our children and grand children.

Such businesses exist and I wrote about them in my first two books.  The most significant example today is probably Tesla, who are committed to hastening the transition away from fossil fuels.  As a result of this Tesla are the victims of extensive sabotage efforts in the media and from mass shorting of their shares.  As long as they survive the conservative world’s efforts to stop them, Tesla will be insanely profitable, precisely because they are able to create so much value for so many and take a little of that margin for themselves.

At Holos ourselves our intention is to create substantial value in every interaction.  (My personal target is 1000 times what I am paid as the ripples go out from an intervention.)  Our plan is to help as many organisations as possible shift to fully authentic leadership so that the businesses, all of their stakeholders and their grandchildren can benefit from this win/win/win thinking.

When businesses exploit or extract everyone, including employees, is a competitor.  When we pursue a positive purpose there are far greater opportunities to collaborate.  “Boss” style leadership has to compete because their prime motivation is status.  It is only through Authentic Leadership that we can widely collaborate, because Authentic Leaders are driven by a purpose that followers align with.

Education

What if education was about building the confidence of every child to be the very best version of their authentic self?

Although there are many brilliant, wonderful teachers out there who strive to do just that, they are compromised by an education system that prioritises obedience over confidence.

An education system that prioritised confidence would deal far more effectively with behavioural issues, like bullying than most schools do today and would avoid teaching, testing and rewarding arcane subjects like algebra.

There is no doubt that algebra is fantastically useful for engineers and mathematicians, but for the rest of us it is rarely useful.  And yet the conventional education system requires that mathematics has more time spent on it than any other subject – why?

Looking back through the history of education it becomes apparent that the primary purpose of schooling children was to ensure an obedient workforce to work in factories, fight in trenches and operate a civil service. Our education today, in much of the world, is a legacy of this thinking.  Not only this but much of the programming is still around individual testing and marking.

Today the needs are radically different.  We need creative, collaborative, problem solving, self motivated, self disciplined people who are capable of influencing authority figures not just deferring to them.

The most important lesson our children learn in school today is how to relate to one another, how to make friends and deal with the tricky characters – peers and teachers.  We need schools to help them work these things out not just leave them to it.

And of course there are schools that do just that it is just that they are very much in the minority.  We need Authentic Leadership in education to migrate the system further away from obedience and towards confidence and collaboration in particular.

Government

What if government served and unified society, to create a better life for all and helped us to deal with the long term and existential threats we face?

It is perfectly possible to have a democratically elected government that does this, indeed there are many countries that already do.

However the most frighteningly backward area for leadership in our society is in politics.  Politics appears to be the last redoubt of Ruler and Boss style leadership, in far to many countries.  Government, as the name suggests, should be about governing, not the self aggrandisement of status hungry individuals.

Environmental damage, in the form of climate change, pollution, soil depletion, species loss and so on,  is by far the greatest threat we face as a society.  Any politician who fails to make this point is either disingenuous or dangerously ignorant and therefore unfit for office.

Politicians continue to distract us with petty bickering about how the pie we are busy destroying gets carved up and by allowing ourselves to be distracted we risk leaving our grandchildren to deal with a vile legacy.

We need voters to understand Authentic Leadership so that they never elect a politician who isn’t authentic again.  (Please note, I know that some people describe certain politicians as “authentic” because they say whatever is on their mind.  For me part of the skill of being authentic is not compromising the authenticity of others.  Therefore it can never be authentic to denigrate, bully or agress others.).

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

Posted in Business, Leadership, society, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Succeeding in challenging conversations

Over the last year or so we have been working with a group of actors (the same ones you see at places like Hampton Court and the Tower of London).  They have been helping us with a number of clients where we want participants to practice difficult conversations with heightened emotions.

The experience has been fascinating and I wanted to share some of the learning we have taken from running these experiences with around 300 participants.  It is worth saying that these sessions are designed to be somewhat confronting.  While the participants were diverse in most obvious ways they were all senior leaders in corporations.

1 – Authority figures – I am sure that most of us understand this intrinsically, if not from the Stanley Milgram experiments.  However, it is still challenging to realise just how few people are willing to challenge authority figures – even when they are senior people in their own right and know that the authority figures  are actors.  Out of our 300 people 3 individuals challenged the authority figure.  Out of them 2 were successful and only 1 was skilful.

The reason for this goes back to childhood and most commonly the fact that corporations tend to hire people who were successful at school and in most cases success at school requires us to defer to authority figures.  It appears that this is a lesson we learn well.

Excessive obedience and deference to authority figures creates risk for organisations.  It means that people, even senior people, will fail to speak up when things are going wrong or when they don’t understand something.  It also stifles creativity and reduces the chances of people contributing their own ideas.

As leaders we have to be aware of this shadow, even if the shadow is not our own.  We have to overcompensate for hierarchy by actively creating an environment of Psychological Safety and trust, where people feel safe to speak up and feel valued when they do.

2 – Dealing with other peoples emotions – Abilities to deal with other people’s emotions vary a great deal.  Most of us find dealing with an upset colleague stressful and confronting.  When faced with a visibly upset colleague very few can combine empathy with objectivity.  A few distance themselves from the emotion entirely and ignore it – even if the emotion then escalates.  Most will overcompensate and miss important factors as well as overcommitting themselves to actions in the future in the hope of reducing the anxiety now.

The very fine line of both calming the situation down and solving the problem appropriately is difficult to tread.  Especially as few of us have regular practice at dealing with these situations and when we do, we rarely have detailed feedback to learn from them – which was what happened in our simulations, see below.

The best approach seemed to be to first deal with the emotion empathetically and by focussing on general principles, without attempting to deal with the specific problem.  Once the emotions had subsided establish the facts and seek solutions.  The risk of not doing this was that the upset colleague’s own role in creating and solving the problem was often overlooked.

3 – Dealing with our own emotions – Very few of our participants were skilled in their own “State Awareness” or “State Management”, meaning that in the moment they did not have a good understanding of their own emotions or an ability to regulate them.  Around 3% were aware of their own “emotional leakage”.  The challenge of being able to hold both the situation, their own emotion, the emotion of others and the future in their consciousness at the same time felt very difficult to the majority.

On the whole the tendency was to react rather than respond, leading to outcomes that were generally good in the short term, but less than optimal in the medium term.

Those that managed it, typically had techniques for deliberately shifting themselves from System 1 to System 2 thinking, mostly by buying themselves some time.  Often this was done by asking more questions, but we also had people offering a glass of water and dropping pencils.

4 – Double hatting –  In our set up we had 2 leaders in a meeting with one other individual in a number of difference scenarios.  Most of these leaders were used to running this kind of conversation on their own and some were confused and even resistant to the idea of “double hatting” the meeting beforehand.

After the simulation had run there was universal appreciation of the value of having two leaders in the meeting.  The value of a second perspective, of time to think, of being able to play different roles and of being able to learn from each other made it very worthwhile. Several said that they would make a practice of doing it for regular meetings.

5 – Feedback – As well as the two leaders and an actor in our set up we also had three observers, focussing on the quality of listening, action and emotion in the conversation plus one of our team of facilitators.  At the end of the scenario the facilitator would first ask the leaders what they felt had gone well and how it could have been even better.  Then each of the observers and the actor before finally giving their own feedback.  The scenario usually lasted about 10 minutes and was followed by about 30 minutes of feedback using this “Appreciative enquiry” model.

While the scrutiny may have been a little uncomfortable at first the emotion of the actors immediately focussed the leader and they were straight into the drama of the scenario and forgot the observers.  All of the participants found tremendous value in the feedback after the scenario.  It is interesting that in organisations, meetings are often the key place where performance occurs and yet, unlike actors or athletes, we very rarely analyse these performances so that we can learn from them and improve.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

Posted in Business, coaching and training, Leadership, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The trouble with Authentic Leadership

I had a meeting last week about coaching, the individual had recently been appointed to a leadership position in a large organisation, but were struggling with “Impostor Syndrome” in showing leadership in the prevailing organisational culture.

What this conversation and potentially the coaching relates to is a highly authentic individual struggling to self identify as a leader in a highly “boss style” culture.

I am increasingly of the belief that many, perhaps even most leaders are in fact authentic, but due to the prevailing culture and a lack of support, training or understanding, they show up as boss style leaders.

Let me explain.

Boss style leaders are those who are primarily motivated by status.  They get their status conferred on them from above and are loyal to those who give them status.  They, in turn, gain loyalty by conferring status on those below them.  Boss style leaders are not good at collaborating unless it helps to build their status or that of their own boss.  Boss style leaders are good at getting things done, but they only achieve results by stealing from the future.

Authentic leaders are those primarily motivated by purpose they create results by aligning teams and getting the best out of people by creating an environment where they can be the best version of themselves.  They create environments of psychological safety and trust where it is safe to experiment and be vulnerable.  Authentic leaders can take longer to achieve things, but the results are sustainable.

Boss style leaders don’t recognise authentic leaders as leaders at all.  They see them as weak.

So – if you are, at heart an authentic style leader, but all of your role models are boss style, it is not surprising if you don’t think of yourself as a leader.  It is also not surprising if, in the absence of alternative input and appointed to a leadership position, a natural, but uncertain authentic leader would adopt boss style behaviours, especially if other bosses around them dismissed authentic leadership as weak.

Our path to authentic leadership is therefore challenging.  In many places the existing leadership culture is actively resistant to it, there are few role models and it is not always easy to find teachers.

What helps is to focus on purpose.  What is it that you are really trying to achieve – your vision?  And why is that important to you – your purpose?

As long as your purpose can be aligned to that of your organisation you can lead authentically in it.  The next step is to think about how you need to be in order to deliver on that purpose and vision.

As long as you can get your team to follow, this forms the basis of your leadership – the “why” and the “what” with the behavioural part of the “how”.  This is the framework that you need to embody and keep explaining – What, we are trying to achieve.  Why, is it important.  How, we need to be in order to deliver it.  As the leader you don’t need to be the author of any of this, but you do need to make sure it is clear and that the team are aligned around it.

The team can then work out  and own the mechanics of the strategy to achieve it.  While you, as the leader encourage, stay out of the way, provide “air cover” and look out for the future.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

 

 

 

Posted in authenticity, Leadership | Leave a comment

Seven Steps to story telling for influence

We were working with two senior leaders in an organisation recently.  One of these leaders inspired loyalty and appeared to be able to influence change whenever required.  The other had an apparently disciplined team, however whenever they would try to create change it would be met with resistance and disquiet.

What  was it that marked out the difference in their approach and lead to the difference in results?

There is a common misconception that positions of authority, such as management or leadership confer control.

They don’t.

Control is an illusion.

Think about it.  Who, the world, do we have the most control over?

Ourselves.

Do we really have control over ourselves? What we eat, what we think, how much exercise we do?  If we don’t have control over ourselves, how could we possibly have control over others?

At best we have influence.  It is true that people in positions of authority can have a great deal of influence.  Anyone who was successful at school (most people who work in large organisations are selected because they were successful at school) are strongly programmed to conformity and obedience.  Success at school is still heavily dependent on waiting to be told what to do by a teacher and then doing what the teacher asks, without question.  (This is not good for learning initiative or leadership.)

So, certainly in organisations which recruit those who were successful at school there is the potential to influence behaviour.  However many attempts at influencing changes in behaviour fail – why?

We  tend to move towards what we love and away from what we fear.  We can use both to influence although love is usually a more sustainable and powerful motivator than fear.

Crucially we are seldom influenced by purely rational information.  We are much more likely to be influenced by a combination of emotional and rational elements.  Storytelling is the model for influencing that is as old as humanity and yet we very often forget to use it in organisational situations.

Here are seven steps to story telling for organisational influence:

1 – Who is your audience?  Be very clear about who you need to influence.  What are their drivers.  What are the choices they have already made in life?  Where do they live?  What did they study?  What hobbies or interests do they have?  In some cases it will be an individual in other cases a group.  Sometimes you will be able to do your research and actually answer these questions in others you will have to make educated guesses.  The exercise is to build up a profile of the individual or type of individual you seek to influence so that you can tailor the story to their hot buttons.

2 – What outcome are you looking for?  Be as specific as you can be about the changes in behaviour or thinking that you want people or individuals to make as a result of hearing the story.

3 – Get very clear on the context.  Why does this change need to happen?  What will happen if the change is not made?  What will happen if it works really well?  What are the vision (destination) and purpose of the change?  What, specifically, is the change you believe is needed?

4 – What are the relevant examples, metaphors or analogies that turn this from a message into a story?  For many of us brought up on a diet of left brain thinking this is the difficult bit.  How can you bring this to life in a way that your target audience will connect with?  Think about examples from your own experience, from history, fiction, sports or any where else that might fit it.  Prioritise analogies that appeal to your audience rather than yourself.

5 – Get clear about your own role.  In classic storytelling language are you the hero, the villain or the guardian?  Are you there to save the day, to bring bad news or protect?  How can you demonstrate or communicate your own challenges and commitment to the change?  How can you show vulnerability and therefore build trust?

6 – Build the story.   Put these components together into a compelling and inspiring story.  Avoid jargon and be sure to use sensory words that connect at an emotional level – like passion, nurture, care, love.

7 – Practice.  Stories are always more engaging when they flow well and appear natural.  If you are not a practiced storyteller, practice.  Tell the same story to as many individuals as you can before you share it with your intended audience.

Remarkably a video of one of the very best business leaders telling a story at the point where he really matured as a visionary integral leader exists and it is well worth watching.  Notice how he starts by communicating his own commitment.  Notice how he avoids blaming the audience and how he delivers a message of a shocking level of change in a way that inspires.

The difference between the two leaders at the beginning of this story?  The former routinely used stories, the latter was hyper rational and tried to use his positional authority.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Calling all Authentic Integral Leaders

Humanity is in a pretty challenging space right now.  We face genuinely existential threats from climate change and other environmental damage, that we have created and yet we continue to focus more on what divides us that what could unite us.

Our crisis is one of leadership.  Do we continue to train, elect, select and promote leaders motivate the worst in us and divide us, or do we choose different leaders, those who inspire the best in us and unite us?

Any crisis gets as deep as it needs to get for people to learn the lesson.

We only have the possibility to transcend or succumb to any challenge – until we don’t anymore.

If humanity is to transcend the crisis of our wilful destruction of our life supporting biosphere we have to start training, electing, selecting and promoting a very different kind of leader.

Our desire to avoid personal responsibility leads us to choosing leaders who promise that they know the answers to the problems that really matter and that they are the ones to solve them.  Inevitably this means that the problems we end up addressing, with varying levels of success, are simple and the proposed solutions are short term.  Generally these solutions themselves steal from the future and thus create more problems than they solve.

Whereas the real problems we face are “wicked problems”, solutions are complex and multifaceted and require large scale alignment and behaviour change to solve.

Most of the leaders we tend to choose are not competent to solve these problems so they distract our attention onto seemingly solvable issues like immigration or religious differences.  Even articulating these things as problems is counter productive, but it gets them elected.

Humanity is like a species in it’s teens, just wanting to focus on our own gangs and pleasure, unwilling to even consider the long term.  We urgently need to grow up.

Consistent with these being wicked problems we don’t know the solution, but we do know the answer.

The answer is universal integral authentic leaders.  A massive upgrade in leadership across all areas of society – education, business, public services, charities, government, military, science and religion.

Authentic leadership  means knowing yourself and being it skilfully in all situations AND empowering followers by creating the kind of psychological safety that enables them to be authentic too.

Integral leadership means inspiring followers by honouring all life and the past and future.

Authentic Integral leadership aligns us to solve wicked problems that might imperil the future of life, by inspiring the best in us and using the lessons from history.

The irony for those who would seek enrichment by the conventional means of extraction or exploitation is that the potential from an authentic integral approach is far higher.  Businesses that use the authentic integral approach create value for the future (rather than stealing from it) and therefore have the potential to generate sustained success.

Holos helps make change easy. We help organisations develop their leaders, map out and deliver the changes required to achieve sustained success even in a highly disrupted environment.

At Holos we have been studying change leadership and leadership training in the crucible of reality for years. We know what great leadership looks like and we know the journey to achieve it. We have developed a suite of diagnostic tools to understand where companies and teams are on this journey and how to take them from there to sustained success.

Holos has a wealth of specialist leadership and culture coaches and consultants with decades of experience working with a huge variety of leaders. Holos can help you or your organisation to upgrade it’s leadership to flourish even in a challenging business environment.

Please share your ideas, comment and discuss here – click on the blog title and scroll to the bottom to find the comment box.

You can subscribe for free at http://www.holoschange.com,

PS – We at Holos have always take protection of data and privacy very seriously. We hold only your names and email addresses on this list which is held on AWeber and WordPress servers.

Only Neil has access to this list and we would never share this list with anyone for any purpose.

The list exists only to communicate with subscribers usually to send the Magic Monday emails.

Every email that we send you contains the option at the bottom to update your preferences or to unsubscribe – this is compliant with the requirements of GDPR.

We hope that you are OK with this, if you have any questions or concerns about the way that we hold your data or what we do with it, please let us know or click on the links below to update your data or unsubscribe.

Best

neil

Neil Crofts
Co-Founder
Holos

+447803 774239
neil@holoschange.com
http://www.holoschange.com

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in authenticity, Business, Leadership | Leave a comment